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  • Writer's pictureJack Aling

The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar (Wes Anderson Collection) - Review

The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar

A Terrific Piece of Information.

4.5 / 5

The Guardians of the Galaxy team line up

Directed by Wes Anderson

A rich man learns about a guru who can see without using his eyes. He sets out to master the skill in order to cheat at gambling.


A whimsical dive into the world of Roald Dahl through the masterful eyes of Wes Anderson, The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar congregates a small but effective cast to tell this cosy tale within a tale, inventively told through precise production design and alluring performances at a breakneck speed that feels like you are being read the ultimate bedtime story.



The Swan

A Matter of Humiliation and Human Kindness.

4 / 5

The Guardians of the Galaxy team line up

Directed by Wes Anderson

Two large, ignorant bullies ruthlessly pursue a small, brilliant boy.


A much darker affair, The Swan hands the storytelling over to Rupert Friend who immerses you in this bleak tale that you can’t look away from. In less than 20 minutes, Wes Anderson captures and holds you in his grasp as the growing suspense becomes more intense and out of control before presenting you with an upsettingly inescapable conclusion.



The Rat Catcher

A Matter of Humiliation and Human Kindness.

4 / 5

The Guardians of the Galaxy team line up

Directed by Wes Anderson

In an English village, a reporter and a mechanic listen to a ratcatcher explain his clever plan to outwit his prey.


Ralph Fiennes stars as the titular Ratcatcher in this simple yet effective tale that uses your imagination as a tool, fuelling the flames and building anticipation until it sits on the cusp of becoming a full-blown horror film. Leaving you unnerved throughout and briefly reminds audiences of Anderson's stop-motion nostalgia.



Poison

A Matter of Humiliation and Human Kindness.

4 / 5

The Guardians of the Galaxy team line up

Directed by Wes Anderson

When a poisonous snake slithers onto an Englishman’s stomach in India, his associate and a doctor race to save him.


The final Roald Dahl tale adapted by Wes Anderson, Poison builds stress from the moment go. After building a rhythm of fast-paced storytelling, the long pauses and lack of movement or dialogue make mere moments last forever. Dev Patel shines carrying this tense tale that builds pressure until it begins to boil over as Anderson does the unthinkable: bring out the shaky cam.


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